7th International Conference on Humanoid, Nanotechnology, Information Technology, Communication and Control, Environment, and Management 2014

IEEE HNICEM - ISCIII 2014
Co-located with 10th ERDT Conference

HNICEM

Pleanary Speakers
Speaker Title of Talk
Prof. Abdoullah A. Afjeh
Toledo University, USA
Advances In Offshore Wind Energy Development
Prof. Antonio Bicchi
University of Pisa
Muscles for Robots: Understanding, Designing and Controlling Natural Machine Motion
Prof. Eryk Dutkiewicz
Macquarie University, Australia
Efficient Spectrum Sharing and Utilization for Emerging 5G Networks
Prof. Toshio Fukuda
Beijing Institute of Technology,
Nagoya University/Meijo University, Japan.
Micro and nano robotics for the technological innovations
Prof. Kaoru Hirota
Tokyo Institute of Technology Japan
Visualization Methods of Emotion, Atmosphere, and Kansei
Prof. Oussama Khatib
Stanford University, USA
Living with Robots
Prof. Ioan D. Marinescu
Toledo University, USA
Burnishing of Aerospace Alloy: A Theoretical-Experimental Approach
Prof. Raouf Naguib
BIOCORE Research & Consultancy International, U.K.
Airborne First-Person View Vehicles: Conceptual Applications In Air Pollution Measurement And Environmental Health Risk Assessment
Prof. Yong-Jin Park
Waseda University, Japan
Green Information Centric Networking
Prof. Lawrence Wong
National University of Singapore
Indoor Localization Methods

Advances In Offshore Wind Energy Development

Abdoullah A. Afjeh

Abstract:

Offshore wind energy is conceptually attractive for sustainable energy production because of the abundance of the area, steady and high winds, and proximity to population centers. The global installed wind power capacity exceeded 318 GW in 2013, contributing to produce the electricity use of 8% and 4% in the EU and the US, respectively. However, much of this power capacity comes for onshore wind turbine installations. These have been due to higher cost of energy from offshore wind, considering both capital costs of system acquisition and operation. However, the levelized cost of offshore wind energy has been steadily declining over the past several years because of the rapid pace of innovations in system design, installation technology and practices, as well as improved siting methods. Radically different designs of the offshore wind turbine from conventional onshore designs promise even larger cost reductions and parity with land based wind turbine generator systems within a decade. Prominent among these developments is the development of very large two-blade, downwind turbine systems. This talk will discuss the offshore cost drivers and novel development approaches and turbines designs these costs for dedicated offshore large wind turbine systems.


Efficient Spectrum Sharing and Utilization for Emerging 5G Networks
Prof. Eryk Dutkiewicz
Macquarie University WiMed Research Centre
Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia

Abstract:

The growing demand for a wide range of wireless Internet applications ranging from high-definition immersive video to machine-to-machine (M2M) applications is putting extreme pressure on better utilisation of the available radio spectrum and is spurring research activities for 5G networks. To overcome the expected spectrum “famine” requires highly efficient radio spectrum management schemes with low complexity and high responsiveness to the changing network conditions. Several key technologies are being proposed for emerging 5G networks. These include massive MIMO, base station densification, use of heterogeneous networks and dynamic spectrum sharing. In this talk we overview these technologies and their potential for use in 5G networks. We then focus on dynamic spectrum sharing (DSS) which is regarded as an essential approach to regaining access to otherwise unused spectrum and it is considered an essential component in the development of 5G networks. DSS can be conducted at different time scales. Due to a potentially high cost of setting up the necessary infrastructure, initially the use of DSS may only be attractive to network operators over long time scales of months or years. This approach is currently taken in standards development activities as exemplified by the emergence of the Leased Spectrum Access concept. As the time scale of the operation of DSS decreases, the possibility for utilising more available spectrum holes increases. However, the shorter time scale brings with it challenges. Efficient decisions regarding the use of DSS require accurate knowledge of the spatial and temporal spectrum use in a geographical area of interest. This knowledge can be represented in Radio Environmental Maps (REMs) which need to be generated efficiently and accurately. As the deployment of DSS evolves from longer to shorter time scales of operation, an important design consideration is how to achieve this evolution in a seamless manner. In this presentation we give an overview of the DSS concept and its emergence in standards activities. We also present various approaches of REM generation for use with DSS and the architectural choices for achieving the seamless evolution of DSS.





Micro and nano robotics for the technological innovations
Prof. Toshio Fukuda
Beijing Institute of Technology, Nagoya University/Meijo University, Japan.

Abstract:

Today micro and nano robotics have been making progress for green and life innovations. This science and technology will widely be used in many aspects, such as improving high efficiency, energy consumption, environmental protection, quality of life and human life and so on. For our daily life, it has been used in the real world for the automotive industry, computer and periferal industry, medicine and human care industry, entertainment industry and so on. This talk will give the scope of the future innovation in green and life science and technologies by the micro and nano robotic technologies.


Living with Robots
Oussama Khatib
Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
Department of Computer Science
Stanford University

Abstract:

Robotics is rapidly expanding into the human environment and vigorously engaged in its new emerging challenges. From a largely dominant industrial focus, robotics has undergone, by the turn of the new millennium, a major transformation in scope and dimensions. This expansion has been brought about by the maturity of the field and the advances in its related technologies to address the pressing needs for human-centered robotic applications. Interacting, exploring, and working with humans, the new generation of robots will increasingly touch people and their lives, in homes, workplaces, and communities, providing support in services, entertainment, education, health care, and assistance. The discussion focuses on new design concepts, novel sensing modalities, efficient planning and control strategies, modeling and understanding of human motion and skills, which are among the key requirements for safe, dependable, and competent robots. The exploration of the human-robot connection is proving extremely valuable in providing new avenues for the study of human movement -- with exciting prospects for novel clinical therapies, athletic training, character animation, and human performance improvement.





Burnishing of Aerospace Alloy: A Theoretical-Experimental Approach
Ioan D. Marinescu

Abstract:

Burnishing process is well known as a very effective surface enhancement method for manufacturing alternative to the processes. The current work focuses on obtaining predictive model of surface roughness and residual stresses based on experimental data. Smoother surfaces of aerospace material modified by ball burnishing have been achieved and significant influences of process parameters on both surface roughness and maximum residual stresses are established. A second-order empirical model involving pressure, speed, and feed is developed for surface roughness prediction. The predictive values have good compatibility with experimental results. Pressure plays an important factor on compressive residual stresses, however, the empirical models only have qualitative compatibility with the experimental results.





“Airborne First-Person View Vehicles: Conceptual Applications In Air Pollution Measurement And Environmental Health Risk Assessment”

Raouf Naguib
BIOCORE Research & Consultancy International and Nottingham Trent University
UK

Abstract:

Based on the premise that the environment plays a vital role in the health and wellbeing of populations, this Lecture presents research currently being undertaken by BIOCORE Research & Consultancy International and Nottingham Trent University, UK. The aim of the Lecture is to introduce the concept of using First-Person View (FPV) vehicles in the realm of environmental analysis.

An FPV, also known as remote-person view (RPV), or simply video piloting, is a method used to control a radio-controlled vehicle from the driver or pilot's viewpoint. Most commonly it is used to pilot an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) or a radio-controlled aircraft. The vehicle is either driven or piloted remotely from a first-person perspective via an on-board camera, fed wirelessly to video goggles or a video monitor. More sophisticated setups include a pan-and-tilt camera controlled by a gyroscope sensor in the pilot's goggles and with dual on-board cameras, enabling a true stereoscopic view.

From an environmental research point of view, an FPV can conceptually offer many opportunities for the measurement, analysis and health risk assessment of environmental air pollutants (NOx, SOx, CO, PM2.5, PM10) and events. In a highly polluted city, such as Metro Manila, the use of an FPV to capture and provide air pollution data can be achieved through the mounting of pollutant sensors on the FPV which, along with corresponding GPS data, can exactly identify locations of pollution hotspots within a certain radius of operation. This data can, in turn, be further analysed and subsequently correlated to health data within the same conurbation in order to establish the individual effects of air pollutants on specific disease (such as cardiovascular or respiratory) development and/or exacerbation.


Green Information Centric Networking
Prof. Yong-Jin Park
Waseda University

Abstract:

Information Centric Networking (ICN) has been attracting attention as one of the promising Future Internet architectures. The recent network usage is to access information rather than point-to-point communication. Therefore, ICN primarily accesses information by using its name, instead of a location address like the current IP network. In this talk the background and technological features of ICN are described. The research activities are also introduced. As one of the ongoing research projects, GreenICN is taken up and explained, which is EU-Japan Cooperation Project of FP7. The work programs include Architecture for Green Information Delivery, Information Delivery in Disaster Areas, and Energy-efficient Mobile Video-Delivery.





Visualization Methods of Emotion, Atmosphere, and Kansei
Kaoru Hirota, Fangyan Dong
Tokyo Institute of Technology

Abstract:

The presenters’ group at Tokyo Institute of Technology has been studying on various visualization methods of subjective evaluation information based on mainly fuzzy theory. Three of them are introduced in this plenary talk.

A deep level emotion understanding method has been proposed for agent to agent communication, where customized learning knowledge of an observed agent is used with the observed input information from Kinect. It aims to realize agent dependent emotion understanding by utilizing special customized knowledge of the agent, rather than ordinary surface level emotion understanding by using visual/acoustic/distance information without any customized knowledge. Emotion vector is represented in the affinity pleasure arousal space [-1,1]3 on “Affinity- No-affinity”, “Pleasure-Displeasure”, and “Arousal-Sleep” axes, and.is also represented by a visualization method using shape, brightness, and size. The pleasure-displeasure axis uses a circle, cross, and the intermediate shapes to represent pleasure to displeasure. The brightness represents the arousal-sleep axis where high arousal the figure becomes white, high sleepy becomes black. Finally the size represents the affinity - no-affinity. An example of demonstration scenario is shown by using illustration program.

The second is about visualization of Fuzzy Atmosfield (FA) which is proposed to express the atmosphere in humans-robots communication. The FA is characterized by a 3D fuzzy cubic space with “friendly-hostile”, “lively-calm”, and “casual-formal” based on a cognitive science experiments and principal component analysis. The atmosphere in the communication is expressed by a point in the 3D fuzzy cubic space and is supposed to be varying/moving in the space time by time. To understand easily such movement of the atmosphere, a graphical representation method is also proposed, where “friendly-hostile” information is represented by “shape”, “lively-calm” by “color”, and “casual-formal” by “size”. To illustrate the FA and its visualization method, a demonstration scenario “enjoying home party by five eye robots and four humans” is introduced/demonstrated.

The last is about visualization of KANSEI texture which is expressed by a three-dimensional cube [-1,1]3 and aims to represent visual and/or texture information of an object photo/movie for compensating the information gap between the real object and its photo/movie image. Its graphical visualization method is also proposed. The proposal is expected to be used to get visual/tactile information of the objects in net shopping, robot vision, telemedicine, e-learning, and others, where the real objects are not available but only their still/dynamic images with brief text explanation are obtainable.





Indoor Localization Methods
Lawrence Wong

Abstract:

This presentation will provide an overview of indoor localization methods and recent research studies carried out at the Ambient Intelligence Laboratory at the National University of Singapore. Various methods of localization including finger printing, dead reckoning, cooperative localization, etc. have been investigated. In addition, fusion techniques involving multiple modalities of location sensing are also being explored.





Muscles for Robots: Understanding, Designing and Controlling Natural Machine Motion
Prof. Antonio Bicchi

Abstract:

How can we make a robot move ``naturally''? What makes a natural motion, and how can we reproduce it in an artificial body? To what extent is physical compliance, and its variability, contributing to reduce the gap between the performance and efficiency of present-day robotics and natural motion? In this talk, I will review some of the background, motivations and state of the art in the understanding, design and control of ``naturally moving'' machines. New interfaces between such machines and humans, to favor safe and effective physical interaction, will be also introduced, with reference to applications in teleoperation and prosthetics.