Invited Speakers

 



CONFERENCE SPEAKER PRESENTATION TITLE
Eiichi Tamiya
Osaka University
Advances in Biosensing Technology: What's Next?
Izumi Kubo
Soka University
Bisphenol A Sensor Utilizing Microfluidic Device for ELISA
Jong-Kook Lee
Osaka University
Innovation of Functional Analytical Methods in Excitable Cells
Ruslinda A. Rahim
Universiti Malaysia Perlis
Aptamer-based Biosensor the Frontiers in Diagnostic Applications
Nur Syakimah Ismail
Universiti Malaysia Perlis
Electrochemiluminescence: An Underdog Method for Rapid and Sensitive Detection
Leah Tolosa
University of Maryland Baltimore County
CAST: Sensors for Real World Problems

WORKSHOP FACILITATOR TOPIC
Nanobio-Engineering Lab (TAMIYA LAB)
Osaka University
Workshop on Electrochemical Biosensors, Optical and Plasmonics Biosensors, and Microfluidics for Cell Study

 

 

 


 

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Eiichi Tamiya

Full Professor,
Osaka University

Eiichi Tamiya received his Ph.D. in Science and Engineering from the Tokyo Institute of Technology in 1985. He has been an Assistant Professor at Tokyo Institute of Technology from 1985 to 1987, a Lecturer at Tokyo Institute of Technology from 1987 to 1988, an Associate Professor at Tokyo University from 1988 to 1993 and Professor at Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology from 1993 to 2007. He moved to Osaka University in 2007 as a Professor and headed the Nanobio-engineering lab until now.  His research topics include (1) Biochips and Biosensors, (2) Nanotechnology-based bioscience and bioengineering, (3) Biomass energy conversion systems, (4) POC (point-of-care) biosensors for medical diagnosis, food safety and environmental protection, and (5) Cell based chips for tissue and stem cell engineering.

Presentation Title:
Advances in Biosensing Technology: What’s Next?

Presentation Summary:
Biosensors are analytical devices that detect a specific analyte and produce an observable signal indicating its presence. This signal comes in different forms (e. g. fluorescence, electric current, photoemission, and physicochemical change) that are more easily measured. It has been associated with numerous applications in various areas including food safety standards, genetic analysis, detection of infectious diseases, environmental monitoring, forensic analysis, medicine etc.  It’s a perfect example of what a successful exploitation and utilization of resources in inter-disciplinary studies could achieve; a perfect blend of a number of disciplines. And with the emergence of new technology (e.g. nanotechnology), rapid advances have been witnessed in this field.  Faster, more sensitive, energy-efficient, portable, and label-free type of biosensors are being developed. This talk will cover a brief discussion on what is the current trend in biosensors and where we are heading to.

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Izumi Kubo

Professor,
Graduate School of engineering, Soka University

Izumi Kubo graduated from the Faculty of Science of the University of Tokyo and earned Dr. of Engineering on Bioengineering at Tokyo Institute of Technology in 1986. She has been working on the sensing device based on biochemical recognition or biomimetic molecular recognition elements.






Presentation Title:
Bisphenol A Sensor Utilizing Microfluidic Device for ELISA

Presentation Summary:
A Microfluidic device for enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) was developed. We investigated analytical procedure of bisphenol A based on ELISA using the device. Formula of competitive immuno assay of bisphenol A in small amount of sample was investigated utilizing anti-bisphenol A antibody modified beads. In shorter time with much smaller volume of sample, bisphenol A can be determined.

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Jong-Kook Lee

Endowed Chair Associate Professor,
Department of Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine,
Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University

Jong-Kook Lee Graduated in Nagoya University School of Medicine and got his MD license in 1987.   He worked as a Resident, an Internist and a Cardiologist in medical hospitals in Japan from 1987–1993.  He obtained his PhD degree in Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine in 1998. He worked as a Post-Graduate Researcher in the Division of Cardiology in UCLA School of Medicine in 1995–1998.
He worked as an Assistant Professor in 1998–2004 and Associate Professor in 2004–2010 in the Res. Inst. of Environ. Med. in Nagoya University; He became an Endowed Chair Assoc. Prof. in the Department of Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine in Osaka Univ. Grad. Sch. of Med. in 2010 up to the present).
He is a part of the Councilors of the Japanese Heart Rhythm Society, the Japanese Society of Regenerative Medicine, the International Society of Heart Research, he is a Fellow of the Japanese Society of Internal Medicine (FJSIM), and he is a Board Certified Member of The Japanese Circulation Society.
His research interests include Cardiac Electrophysiology and Regenerative Medicine.

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Nur Syakimah Ismail


Senior Lecturer,
School of Microelectronic Engineering,
Universiti Malaysia Perlis

Nur Syakimah Ismail is a senior lecturer in School of Microelectronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP). She received her Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering from Osaka University, Japan in March 2015. She received her M.Sc and B. Eng degree in Electrical, Electronic and System Engineering from National University of Malaysia, in 2008 and 2004, respectively. She has been working in the industry as a product engineer at Freescale Semiconductor (M) Sdn. Bhd. from 2004 till 2005.
Her research interests include graphene nanoribbons characterization, metal nanoparticle synthesis and electrochemical based biosensors development. Most of her work has been published in high impact journal especially in Biosensor area.

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Ruslinda A. Rahim

Senior Lecturer/Research Fellow,
Institute of Nanoelectronic Engineering
Universiti Malaysia Perlis

Ruslinda Binti A. Rahim received her Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D) in Nanoscience and Nanoengineering from Waseda University, Japan in September 2012. She also received her M. Eng and B. Eng degree in Electrical and Electronic Engineering from Muroran Institute of Technology, Japan in 2007 and 2002, respectively.  
She has been working in the industry as an engineer at the Research and Development Department, Sharp-Roxy (M) Sdn. Bhd. Corporation Company from 2002 till 2004.  Currently, she is a senior lecturer and research fellow in the Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INEE), UniMAP.  She also holds a position as the Deputy Dean in Research Management and Innovation Centre in UniMAP.
Her research interests include carbon-based materials on surface chemistry, DNA and protein biosensors, and nanodevices fabrication.  
She is active in several societies such as the board of Engineers Malaysia, Secretariat of Asiasense 2013, Secretariat of Malaysia-Japan Academic Scholar Conference 2012, board member of HiCoe, member of the Material Research Society (MRS), member of Japan Society of Applied Physics (JSAP), member of Malaysia AIDS Council and member of The Electrochemical Society (ECS). She was a recipient of L’oreal-Unesco For Women in Science Malaysia in 2013.  She also received a numbers of grants such as Newton Fund under Royal Society Fund, L’oreal–Unesco Grant, Fundamental Research Grant Scheme and Research Acceleration Collaborative Scheme under Ministry of Higher Education Malaysia.  Most of her work has been published in high impact journal especially in Biosensor area.

Presentation Title:
Aptamer-based Biosensor the Frontiers in Diagnostic Applications

Presentation Summary:
With the increasing application of proteomic strategies for the detection of cancer related oncoproteins and discovery of bio- markers, it is of extreme interest to develop portable platforms for sensitive detection of proteins and their molecular variants. Aptamers are single stranded DNA or RNA molecules selected in vitro from DNA/RNA random pools that are capable of binding with biological entities such as proteins, cells along with small molecules, drugs, peptides and hormones with high affinity and specificity Aptamers have been sought out as ideal alternative candidates to the traditional antibodies for use in analytical devices due to their easy synthesis, high binding affinity, long storage times, and excellent selectivity. Recent studies have demonstrated the applicability of aptamers to target a disease state, such as cancer, HIV and etc. This opens up new avenues in the future for aptamers to potentially substitute more established components for diagnostics or therapeutics.

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Leah Tolosa


Research Professor,
Center for Advanced Sensor Technology
University of Maryland Baltimore County

Dr. Leah Tolosa got her BS and MS in Chemistry from the University of Santo Tomas under the mentorship of Dr. Fortunato Sevilla. She finished her PhD in Chemistry at the University of Connecticut, USA under Dr. Challa Vijaya Kumar. She did post-doctoral studies at the lab of Dr. Saul Cohen at Brandeis University. She was a Research Associate at the Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy at the University of Maryland School of Medicine under Dr. Joe Lackowicz. She is currently Research Professor and Assistant Director of the Center for Advanced Sensor Technology at the University of Maryland Baltimore County.

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Presentation Title:
CAST: Sensors for Real World Problems

Presentation Summary:
The UMBC Center for Advanced Sensor Technology brings together a team of chemists, molecular biologists, chemical, biochemical and electrical engineers to develop innovative, simple, low-cost, high impact optical sensors for biomedical, environmental and bioprocess applications. Optical sensors rely on a recognition element that produces an optical signal when interacting with an analyte of interest. The optical signal can be absorbance, refractive index, Raman or circular dichroism. But the main optical signal of CAST sensors is luminescence or fluorescence. Our earliest sensing efforts were to monitor cell culture or fermentation in bioreactors. These sensors were designed to measure dissolved oxygen (DO), pH, CO2, glucose and glutamine. The DO and pH were measured wirelessly by attaching the sensor patch inside the bioreactor and the fluorescence signal was measured through the glass. The same strategy was applied in a floating multiplexed sensor for environmental monitoring of DO, pH and CO2 in bodies of water. The glucose and glutamine biosensors were derived from soluble periplasmic proteins in gram negative bacteria. The principle of sensing is based on protein conformational changes in the presence of glucose or glutamine. We have used these biosensors to measure nutrients in mammalian, bacterial and yeast cultures. But in the last few years, we have turned our attention to biomedical applications, specifically in monitoring premature babies in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and sick children in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). The extremely high sensitivities of the glucose biosensor allows us to measure the small concentrations of glucose diffusing through skin. Under the same principle of skin diffusion, we are able to measure respiratory gases, O2 and CO2. In both cases, the need for collecting blood to measure blood glucose and blood gases, which in young patients can cause pain and adverse effects become unnecessary. Our most ambitious project to date is a system for producing and delivering protein drugs (biologics) at the point of care. This effort involves collaborative effort from several institutions and seeks to reduce the requirements for protein drug production from the large factory to the size of a suitcase. In the development of these novel sensors, protection of intellectual property (IP) is of primary interest. Our center has disclosed 50+ inventions and received 15 – 20 patents. A short description of our university’s policies and procedures on IP will be presented.

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NANOBIO-ENGINEERING LAB (TAMIYA LAB)

Biosensors are analytical devices that detect a specific analyte and produce an observable signal indicating its presence. This signal comes in different forms (e. g. fluorescence, electric current, photoemission, and physicochemical change) that is more easily measured. The development of novel biodetection operation and miniaturize analysis systems as innovation to biosensors is the focus of Tamiya Lab. Our interests span a broad range of disciplines and technologies that includes; but not limited to, nano- and microfabrication, biomolecules, microfluidics, single cell study, electrochemistry, photonics, plasmonics, and biofuel cells.

URL:
http://dolphin.ap.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp/nanobio/

Lab Members/2016 BST Workshop Facilitators:
Eiichi Tamiya, Full Professor
Masato Saito, Assistant Professor
Wilfred Espulgar, Post Doc Fellow
Yuki Inoue, Student (PhD Cand.)
Jiang Shu, Student (PhD Cand.)

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