Undergraduate Programs


The Chemistry Department of De La Salle University-Manila offers degree programs to prepare young men and women to cope with the challenges of the times, to seek the answers to the questions that these challenges bring, and make wise choices for the future. Graduates of the program will have an excellent background necessary in pursuing graduate studies (M.S./Ph.D.) in chemistry and related fields such as biochemistry, material science, molecular biology, biotechnology, pharmacology, environmental management, etc. Moreover, as quite a number have done successfully in the past, graduates may even venture into courses that are not stereotypically linked to chemistry as preparatory for such fields as medicine, MBA, and law.

Industry employs chemistry graduates in petrochemicals, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, food technology, personal care products, metallurgy, polymer and paint industry, as industrial administrators, quality assurance officers, research and development specialists, manufacturing analysts and consultants. Government and privates institutions: biotech firms, research laboratories, crime laboratories, food processing firms, pharmaceutical companies, agricultural and environmental orientated organizations, clinics and hospitals employ chemistry graduates. Entrepreneurial graduates may enter the vast market of consumer goods based on chemical reactions either as manufacturers, marketers, or importers. Academia employs chemistry graduates as lecturers and researchers. Recent revisions in the curriculum of BS Chemistry, BS Biochemistry, and BS Chemistry Minor in Business are in line with the Commission on Higher Education’s Benchmarking for BS Chemistry.

List of Undergraduate Programs for COS







Bachelor of Science in Chemistry

Program Specification


  1. Awarding Institution: De La Salle University

  2. Teaching Institution: De La Salle University

  3. Program accredited by: The Philippine Government’s Commission on Higher Education, Philippine Professional Regulation Commission, Philippine Accrediting Association of Schools, Colleges and Universities (PAASCU)

  4. Name of Final Award: BS Chemistry (Bachelor of Science in Chemistry)

  5. Program Title: Chemistry

  6. Goals and Objectives of the Program:
  7. The Department aims to

    • Provide excellent teaching and dynamically updated programs in Chemistry.
    • Promote vigorous research.
    • Develop students into graduates imbued with Christian values, concerned with the sustainability of the environment, and equipped with lifelong abilities to provide service and leadership in the scientific community and in society in general.
    • Support the professional and psychosocial development of the faculty and co-academic personnel.
    • Nurture an environment conducive to learning and research.
    • Adhere to ethical standards of scholarship and professionalism and to live the Christian faith.
    • Produce chemistry graduates well-prepared to assume roles either as: graduate students in chemistry, education, or other fields; professional students in business, law, or medicine; lecturers, faculty members, or researchers in the academe; entrepreneurs; or staff members, administrators, scientists, technical writers, or research staff in various industries, government agencies, and non-governmental organizations.

  8. Program Learning Outcomes:
    1. Fundamental skills
      • Conceptual understanding and problem-solving skills in the fields of analytical, organic, inorganic, biochemistry, and physical chemistry
      • Ability to apply fundamental principles and concepts in physics and mathematics to chemical problems
      • Ability to evaluate, synthesize, and interpret scientific data and then draw logical conclusions
      • Ability to critically read primary papers
      • Ability to perform chemical computation and data processing

    2. Practical skills
      • Laboratory skills relating to safety, waste management, and record keeping
      • Proper use of modern chemical instrumentation
      • Skills required for the conduct of standard laboratory procedures and use of instrumentation in analytical and synthetic work, in relation to both organic and inorganic systems
      • Skills in the monitoring, by observation and measurement, of chemical properties, events, or changes, and the systematic and reliable recording and documentation thereof
      • Ability to evaluate and interpret data derived from laboratory observations and measurements in terms of their significance, and to relate them to appropriate theories
      • Ability to design experiments and understand their limitations and the ability to design suitable alternative procedures and methods

    3. Other skills
      • Communication skills, covering both written and oral communication. This includes the ability to present scientific information in a clear and concise manner and to discuss them intelligently, both in writing and orally.
      • Ability to dissect a problem into its key features; problem-solving skills relating to qualitative and quantitative information
      • Numeracy and calculation skills including skills such as as error analysis, order-of-magnitude estimations, and correct use of units
      • Ability to use computers as information and research tools; skills in information retrieval and evaluation in relation to primary and secondary information sources, including information retrieval through on-line computer and traditional library searches
      • Interpersonal skills relating to the ability to interact with other people and to work in a team; ability to collaborate with other researchers
      • Study and self-development skills needed for continuing professional development and life-long learning
      • Ability to exercise ethical principles and social responsibility in their professional and personal endeavors


  9. Teaching, Learning and Assessment strategies to enable outcomes to be achieved and demonstrated:
  10. Faculty members use a variety of methods to assess students’ performance, depending on the type of course being taught. Examples of these methods include written examinations, final examinations, quizzes, assigned homework, practical laboratory exam, oral presentations/seminars, and research reports. Grading in general education courses is guided by a rubric created by the course coordinator. Grading is mostly based on a scale of 1.0 to 4.0, with 4.0 being the highest and 0.0 being a failing grade.

    On the first day of class, each faculty member is required to distribute the course syllabus to students. The syllabus must indicate the course description, course objectives, topics to be covered with the schedule or number of hours per topic, teaching methods to be used, requirements for the students, assessment and evaluation, textbook/materials, references, classroom policies and consultation hours. The instructor discusses the entire syllabus with the class including the details of how the student will be evaluated, and how the final grade is broken down according to the weights given to course requirements and exams. The syllabus usually indicates the schedule of major exams throughout the term and the deadlines for submission of projects.

    The content of the examinations and assignments is defined to a large extent by the course syllabi, which are themselves subject to periodic review by the Department. To ensure objectivity, the Department requires that course coordinators be assigned for each course. The course coordinators are in-charge of coordinating any revisions or changes in the syllabus for each course and the preparation of the departmental final examinations for those courses. The Department also requires that each syllabus specify a uniform method for assessing student performance and for computing the students’ final grades.


  11. Program Structure:
  12. The Bachelor of Science in Chemistry program is designed to provide students with an excellent foundation in chemistry. It equips them with the necessary laboratory skills and scientific training needed in the competent practice of the chemistry profession. Lectures, seminars and laboratory classes are geared towards problem evaluation and decision-making. Courses in the humanities and social sciences are integrated to provide the perspective that will direct scientific efforts toward national concerns. Graduates are qualified to take the Chemistry Licensure Examination conducted by the Professional Regulation Commission and become licensed chemists.

    CHED Minimum Standards
    CMO 18 s 2007
    Units
    DLSU CURRICULUM
    Units
    GE Courses GEC-B 51 CHED Mandated GE Courses, GEC-B 51
    DLSU GE Courses 26
       Academic (26)
       Non-academic (10)
    Core Courses
        Science and Math Component
       (some of the Science and Math
       subjects are already in the GE)
    13     Science and Math Component
       (some of the Science and Math subjects
        are already in the GE)
    21
        Chemistry 48     Chemistry 67
    Electives 6 Electives 6
    Thesis/Professional Exposure 6 Thesis/Professional Exposure 6
    TOTAL 124 177 + (10)

    Refer to the Program Checklist for the courses that the students under the Chemistry program are required to take for each trimester. This checklist is given to students during their first year. The checklist includes the prerequisite subjects needed to take the later subjects.

    A grade of at least 1.0 is required in the prerequisite subjects to be able to move on to the next course in the checklist. A student becomes eligible for graduation and conferring of the degree once he or she has been able to comply with all the coursework and requirements of the program.


  13. Criteria for Admission to the Program:
  14. Applicants to the Department programs undergo an application process during any term of each academic year, which requires the student to pass the entrance examination and interview. In addition, applicants are required to submit their high school grades and letters of recommendation.


  15. Particular learning support provided to students:
    • Faculty members are required to devote 10 hours of their residence at the University to student consultation.
    • The University Library houses a collection of approximately 300,000 books with almost 10,000 volumes on deposit, and close to 23,000 volumes of graduate and undergraduate theses and dissertations, and more than 17,000 titles of journals, of which more than 400 are in print. The electronic library facility allows students and faculty access to online titles, including major Literature journals.
    • Students are provided with internet access through the computer terminals available all over the campus. WiFi connections are also available in various areas of the campus.
    • The university also has facilities for studying and recreation for the students as well an art museum and a creative writing center.

  16. Date on which the revised program specification was written:
  17. 30 July 2010


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Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry


Program Specification


  1. Awarding Institution: De La Salle University

  2. Teaching Institution: De La Salle University

  3. Program accredited by: The Philippine Government’s Commission on Higher Education, Philippine Professional Regulation Commission, Philippine Accrediting Association of Schools, Colleges and Universities (PAASCU)

  4. Name of Final Award: BS Biochemistry (Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry)

  5. Program Title: Biochemistry

  6. Goals and Objectives of the Program:
  7. The Department aims to

    • Provide excellent teaching and dynamically updated programs in Chemistry.
    • Promote vigorous research.
    • Develop students into graduates imbued with Christian values, concerned with the sustainability of the environment, and equipped with lifelong abilities to provide service and leadership in the scientific community and in society in general.
    • Support the professional and psychosocial development of the faculty and co-academic personnel.
    • Nurture an environment conducive to learning and research.
    • Adhere to ethical standards of scholarship and professionalism and to live the Christian faith.
    • Produce chemistry graduates well-prepared to assume roles either as: graduate students in chemistry, education, or other fields; professional students in business, law, or medicine; lecturers, faculty members, or researchers in the academe; entrepreneurs; or staff members, administrators, scientists, technical writers, or research staff in various industries, government agencies, and non-governmental organizations.

  8. Program Learning Outcomes:
    1. Fundamental skills
      • Demonstrate an understanding of biology at the level of molecules, cells, systems, and organisms.
      • Demonstrate an understanding of key concepts in cell biology, genetics, comparative anatomy, botany, zoology, and either embryology or physiology
      • Conceptual understanding and problem-solving skills in the fields of analytical, organic, inorganic, biochemistry, and physical chemistry
      • Ability to apply fundamental principles and concepts in physics and mathematics to chemical problems
      • Ability to evaluate, synthesize, and interpret scientific data and then draw logical conclusions
      • Ability to critically read primary papers
      • Ability to perform chemical computation and data processing

    2. Practical skills
      • Laboratory skills relating to safety, waste management, and record keeping
      • Proper use of modern chemical instrumentation
      • Skills required for the conduct of standard laboratory procedures and use of instrumentation in analytical and synthetic work, in relation to both organic and inorganic systems
      • Skills in the monitoring, by observation and measurement, of chemical properties, events, or changes, and the systematic and reliable recording and documentation thereof
      • Ability to evaluate and interpret data derived from laboratory observations and measurements in terms of their significance, and to relate them to appropriate theories
      • Ability to design experiments and understand their limitations and the ability to design suitable alternative procedures and methods

    3. Other skills
      • Communication skills, covering both written and oral communication. This includes the ability to present scientific information in a clear and concise manner and to discuss them intelligently, both in writing and orally.
      • Ability to dissect a problem into its key features; problem-solving skills relating to qualitative and quantitative information
      • Numeracy and calculation skills including skills such as as error analysis, order-of-magnitude estimations, and correct use of units
      • Ability to use computers as information and research tools; skills in information retrieval and evaluation in relation to primary and secondary information sources, including information retrieval through on-line computer and traditional library searches
      • Interpersonal skills relating to the ability to interact with other people and to work in a team; ability to collaborate with other researchers
      • Study and self-development skills needed for continuing professional development and life-long learning
      • Ability to exercise ethical principles and social responsibility in their professional and personal endeavors


  9. Teaching, Learning and Assessment strategies to enable outcomes to be achieved and demonstrated:
  10. Faculty members use a variety of methods to assess students’ performance, depending on the type of course being taught. Examples of these methods include written examinations, final examinations, quizzes, assigned homework, practical laboratory exam, oral presentations/seminars, and research reports. Grading in general education courses is guided by a rubric created by the course coordinator. Grading is mostly based on a scale of 1.0 to 4.0, with 4.0 being the highest and 0.0 being a failing grade.

    On the first day of class, each faculty member is required to distribute the course syllabus to students. The syllabus must indicate the course description, course objectives, topics to be covered with the schedule or number of hours per topic, teaching methods to be used, requirements for the students, assessment and evaluation, textbook/materials, references, classroom policies and consultation hours. The instructor discusses the entire syllabus with the class including the details of how the student will be evaluated, and how the final grade is broken down according to the weights given to course requirements and exams. The syllabus usually indicates the schedule of major exams throughout the term and the deadlines for submission of projects.

    The content of the examinations and assignments is defined to a large extent by the course syllabi, which are themselves subject to periodic review by the Department. To ensure objectivity, the Department requires that course coordinators be assigned for each course. The course coordinators are in-charge of coordinating any revisions or changes in the syllabus for each course and the preparation of the departmental final examinations for those courses. The Department also requires that each syllabus specify a uniform method for assessing student performance and for computing the students’ final grades.


  11. Program Structure:
  12. Biochemistry, the study of the molecules of life, encompasses chemical tools to provide an understanding of biological processes at the molecular level. Biochemistry now enjoys a premier spot in researches worldwide. The BS Biochemistry program is aimed at producing well-trained graduates with a sound understanding of chemical and biological concepts. The program is an excellent background for those who want to be admitted to a school of medicine, dentistry and veterinary medicine. In addition graduates are qualified to take the Chemistry Licensure Examination conducted by the Professional Regulation Commission and become licensed chemists.

    CHED Minimum Standards
    CMO 18 s 2007
    Units
    DLSU CURRICULUM
    Units
    GE Courses GEC-B 51 CHED Mandated GE Courses, GEC-B 51
    DLSU GE Courses 26
        Academic (26)
        Non-academic (10)
    Core Courses Core Courses
        Science and Math Component
       (some of the Science and Math subjects
       are already in the GE)
    13     Science and Math Component
       (some of the Science and Math subjects
       are already in the GE)
    49
        Chemistry 48     Chemistry 60
    Electives 6 Electives 6
    Thesis/Professional Exposure 6 Thesis/Professional Exposure 6
    TOTAL 124 198 + (10)

    Refer to the Program Checklist for the courses that the students under the Biochemistry program are required to take for each trimester. This checklist is given to students during their first year. The checklist includes the prerequisite subjects needed to take the later subjects.

    A grade of at least 1.0 is required in the prerequisite subjects to be able to move on to the next course in the checklist. A student becomes eligible for graduation and conferring of the degree once he or she has been able to comply with all the coursework and requirements of the program.


  13. Criteria for Admission to the Program:
  14. Applicants to the Department programs undergo an application process during any term of each academic year, which requires the student to pass the entrance examination and interview. In addition, applicants are required to submit their high school grades and letters of recommendation.


  15. Particular learning support provided to students:
    • Faculty members are required to devote 10 hours of their residence at the University to student consultation.
    • The University Library houses a collection of approximately 300,000 books with almost 10,000 volumes on deposit, and close to 23,000 volumes of graduate and undergraduate theses and dissertations, and more than 17,000 titles of journals, of which more than 400 are in print. The electronic library facility allows students and faculty access to online titles, including major Literature journals.
    • Students are provided with internet access through the computer terminals available all over the campus. WiFi connections are also available in various areas of the campus.
    • The university also has facilities for studying and recreation for the students as well an art museum and a creative writing center.

  16. Date on which the revised program specification was written:
  17. 30 July 2010


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Bachelor of Science in Chemistry Minor in Business

Program Specification


  1. Awarding Institution: De La Salle University

  2. Teaching Institution: De La Salle University

  3. Program accredited by: The Philippine Government’s Commission on Higher Education, Philippine Professional Regulation Commission, Philippine Accrediting Association of Schools, Colleges and Universities (PAASCU)

  4. Name of Final Award: BS Chemistry Minor in Business (Bachelor of Science in Chemistry Minor in Business)

  5. Program Title: Chemistry Minor in Business

  6. Goals and Objectives of the Program:
  7. The Department aims to

    • Provide excellent teaching and dynamically updated programs in Chemistry.
    • Promote vigorous research.
    • Develop students into graduates imbued with Christian values, concerned with the sustainability of the environment, and equipped with lifelong abilities to provide service and leadership in the scientific community and in society in general.
    • Support the professional and psychosocial development of the faculty and co-academic personnel.
    • Nurture an environment conducive to learning and research.
    • Adhere to ethical standards of scholarship and professionalism and to live the Christian faith.
    • Produce chemistry graduates well-prepared to assume roles either as: graduate students in chemistry, education, or other fields; professional students in business, law, or medicine; lecturers, faculty members, or researchers in the academe; entrepreneurs; or staff members, administrators, scientists, technical writers, or research staff in various industries, government agencies, and non-governmental organizations.

  8. Program Learning Outcomes:
    1. Fundamental skills
      • Demonstrate an understanding of key concepts and applications of basic financial management, accounting, marketing, business planning (includes coming up with a product, feasibility studies, and planning), and business theories.
      • Demonstrate an understanding of obligations and contracts as they pertain to business transactions
      • Conceptual understanding and problem-solving skills in the fields of analytical, organic, inorganic, biochemistry, and physical chemistry
      • Ability to apply fundamental principles and concepts in physics and mathematics to chemical problems
      • Ability to evaluate, synthesize, and interpret scientific data and then draw logical conclusions
      • Ability to critically read primary papers
      • Ability to perform chemical computation and data processing

    2. Practical skills
      • Laboratory skills relating to safety, waste management, and record keeping
      • Proper use of modern chemical instrumentation
      • Skills required for the conduct of standard laboratory procedures and use of instrumentation in analytical and synthetic work, in relation to both organic and inorganic systems
      • Skills in the monitoring, by observation and measurement, of chemical properties, events, or changes, and the systematic and reliable recording and documentation thereof
      • Ability to evaluate and interpret data derived from laboratory observations and measurements in terms of their significance, and to relate them to appropriate theories
      • Ability to design experiments and understand their limitations and the ability to design suitable alternative procedures and methods

    3. Other skills
      • Communication skills, covering both written and oral communication. This includes the ability to present scientific information in a clear and concise manner and to discuss them intelligently, both in writing and orally.
      • Ability to dissect a problem into its key features; problem-solving skills relating to qualitative and quantitative information
      • Numeracy and calculation skills including skills such as error analysis, order-of-magnitude estimations, and correct use of units
      • Ability to use computers as information and research tools; skills in information retrieval and evaluation in relation to primary and secondary information sources, including information retrieval through on-line computer and traditional library searches
      • Interpersonal skills relating to the ability to interact with other people and to work in a team; ability to collaborate with other researchers
      • Study and self-development skills needed for continuing professional development and life-long learning
      • Ability to exercise ethical principles and social responsibility in their professional and personal endeavors


  9. Teaching, Learning and Assessment strategies to enable outcomes to be achieved and demonstrated:
  10. Faculty members use a variety of methods to assess students’ performance, depending on the type of course being taught. Examples of these methods include written examinations, final examinations, quizzes, assigned homework, practical laboratory exam, oral presentations/seminars, and research reports. Grading in general education courses is guided by a rubric created by the course coordinator. Grading is mostly based on a scale of 1.0 to 4.0, with 4.0 being the highest and 0.0 being a failing grade.

    On the first day of class, each faculty member is required to distribute the course syllabus to students. The syllabus must indicate the course description, course objectives, topics to be covered with the schedule or number of hours per topic, teaching methods to be used, requirements for the students, assessment and evaluation, textbook/materials, references, classroom policies and consultation hours. The instructor discusses the entire syllabus with the class including the details of how the student will be evaluated, and how the final grade is broken down according to the weights given to course requirements and exams. The syllabus usually indicates the schedule of major exams throughout the term and the deadlines for submission of projects.

    The content of the examinations and assignments is defined to a large extent by the course syllabi, which are themselves subject to periodic review by the Department. To ensure objectivity, the Department requires that course coordinators be assigned for each course. The course coordinators are in-charge of coordinating any revisions or changes in the syllabus for each course and the preparation of the departmental final examinations for those courses. The Department also requires that each syllabus specify a uniform method for assessing student performance and for computing the students’ final grades.


  11. Program Structure:
  12. The Bachelor of Science Chemistry in Minor in Business program aims to produce competent and well-trained graduates with sound understanding of chemical and business concepts. In addition graduates are qualified to take the Chemistry Licensure Examination conducted by the Professional Regulation Commission and become licensed chemists. Their background will qualify them for careers in the following areas: formulation, analysis and testing, consulting, research and development, environmental analyses, forensics, industrial quality control, marketing, management, technical sales, teaching, chemical or instrumentation sales, entrepreneurship. They may suit up for work in private and government institutions: laboratories, manufacturing, universities and colleges, biotech firms, food processing firms, pharmaceutical companies, agricultural, and environmentally-oriented organizations.

    CHED Minimum Standards
    CMO 18 s 2007
    Units
    DLSU CURRICULUM
    Units
    GE Courses GEC-B 51 CHED Mandated GE Courses, GEC-B 51
    DLSU GE Courses 26
        Academic (26)
       Non-academic (10)
    Core Courses Core Courses
       Science and Math Component
       (some of the Science and Math subjects
       are already in the GE)
    13     20
       Chemistry 48    Chemistry 67
    Electives 6 Electives
    Thesis/Professional Exposure 6 Thesis/Professional Exposure 6
    Business Courses 24
    TOTAL 124 194 + (10)

    Refer to the Program Checklist for the courses that the students under the Chemistry Minor in Business program are required to take for each trimester. This checklist is given to students during their first year. The checklist includes the prerequisite subjects needed to take the later subjects.

    A grade of at least 1.0 is required in the prerequisite subjects to be able to move on to the next course in the checklist. A student becomes eligible for graduation and conferring of the degree once he or she has been able to comply with all the coursework and requirements of the program.


  13. Criteria for Admission to the Program:
  14. Applicants to the Department programs undergo an application process during any term of each academic year, which requires the student to pass the entrance examination and interview. In addition, applicants are required to submit their high school grades and letters of recommendation.


  15. Particular learning support provided to students:
    • Faculty members are required to devote 10 hours of their residence at the University to student consultation.
    • The University Library houses a collection of approximately 300,000 books with almost 10,000 volumes on deposit, and close to 23,000 volumes of graduate and undergraduate theses and dissertations, and more than 17,000 titles of journals, of which more than 400 are in print. The electronic library facility allows students and faculty access to online titles, including major Literature journals.
    • Students are provided with internet access through the computer terminals available all over the campus. WiFi connections are also available in various areas of the campus.
    • The university also has facilities for studying and recreation for the students as well an art museum and a creative writing center.

  16. Date on which the revised program specification was written:
  17. 30 July 2010

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